Between a Rock and a Setting Sun

Neil Raitt

November 13 - December 18, 2021

Apparition

Greg Ito

October 2 - November 20, 2021

Fossils

Faith Wilding

October 2 - November 20, 2021

Between a Rock and a Setting Sun

Neil Raitt

November 13 - December 18, 2021

For his third solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, Neil Raitt has created eight new paintings and a suite of watercolors for an exhibition titled Between a Rock and a Setting Sun. On view at 2660 S La Cienega Blvd, opening Saturday, November 13, 2021.

Neil Raitt’s surreal landscapes test the limits of reality and artificiality. His paintings depict impossible places and forego the idea of an original relationship to a real or even specific place. Terrains, climates, disparate geographies are all mixed together becoming a portal to an emotional or psychological space. Their impossibleness acts almost as a parody or critique of traditional sea and landscapes and argues for the possibility of fresh perspectives. Free from nostalgia and lamentation of fading natural beauty, Raitt’s landscapes have an almost mythological, dream-like quality conveyed both through the saturated intensity of his color and the strangeness of the wolf silhouettes repeated through several works.

The title of the exhibition Between a Rock and a Setting Sun nods to Raitt’s shift away from infinite interlocking landscapes with the introduction of suns, moons, and distinct horizons to his work for the first time. Still, he continues to subvert and displace traditional illusions of space. Viewers have a sense of being in two places at once as cave-like forests open out to distant seashores. Meadows and glades are dotted with desert flora and bathed in the tropical light of setting suns, one gets the sense that these scenes are lit from within.

Over time Raitt’s process has evolved to become more intuitive, resulting in paintings that emerge slowly through delicate brushy layers. Working the compositions out first in watercolor produces a fluidity and looseness that distinguishes the pieces from previous bodies of work. Due to the repeating nature of his earlier paintings, Raitt could start at the top of a canvas and work his way down in a near-mechanical fashion resulting in abstract and maze-like pictures. Together the works in this exhibition embrace the romantic and expressive possibilities of painting, uncovering a world that is open and mysterious, wild and irregular.

Neil Raitt (b. 1986) received his MA from the Royal College of Art, London in 2013. Over the past ten years he has been included in solo and group exhibitions at Nicelle Beauchene, New York, NY; The Cabin, Los Angeles, CA; Chez Valentin, Paris; Choi & Lager, Cologne; The Hole, New York, NY; Lin & Lin Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan; and Rental Gallery, East Hampton, NY. His work has been exhibited at institutions including the Centre d’art contemporain La Halle des bouchers, Vienne; Villa Du Parc centre d’art contemporain, Annemasse; the DePaul University Art Museum, Chicago; and the Goss-Michael Foundation, Dallas. He was the recipient of the Northern Trust Acquisition Prize, 2016 and the Catlin Art Prize, 2014. His work is in the permanent collections of Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles, CA; DePaul Art Museum, Chicago; Saatchi Collection, London; and Frank-Suss Collection, London. Raitt lives and works in London.

Apparition

Greg Ito

October 2 - November 20, 2021

Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce Apparition, an immersive exhibition by Los Angeles artist Greg Ito. On view at 6150 Wilshire Blvd, opening Saturday, October 2, 2021. This is Ito’s first solo exhibition with the gallery and follows up The Arrival of Spring, a solo presentation at Art Basel Hong Kong earlier this year.

In six new paintings Ito deep-dives into his expansive cinematic compositions. These works contemplate themes of new life, metamorphosis, and the ghosts we live with—personal history, generational trauma, and the invisible weight of being alive. Among Ito’s subjects are flaming hillsides of Southern California, sprawling city streets surveilled by helicopters, and smoky sunsets; this darker imagery is contrasted by blooming poppies, flittering ginkgo leaves, and butterflies.

In his largest painting to date, a five-paneled work titled Motion Picture, Ito depicts a dramatic and layered landscape framed by arched floor to ceiling windows and billowing burning curtains. Fundamentally a storyteller, the artist is driven by the momentum of narrative and repeating motifs—moons, suns, flames, keyholes, clocks, teapots, and horizons—that operate with a dreamlike logic that is playful with scale, superimposition, and silhouettes.

Prominent in a corner of the gallery is a large house with a pristine facade that visitors can enter. Once inside, it is revealed to be damaged and burned out. The house on fire is a recurring symbol for Ito and functions conceptually as a self portrait. It speaks not only to his grandparents’ experience as Japanese-Americans during World War II and their forced removal to internment camps, but also his own experience as a fourth-generation Angeleno with immigrant roots. For immigrant families, home is both where you are and elsewhere; it is a fleeting and fragile refuge from the outside world, where connection to the past is preserved and hopes for the future are nurtured. The idea of home also takes on a new profound meaning for Ito, who became a father earlier this year, speaking to his desire to build a secure and stable life for his new family.

Two sculptures in the exhibition underscore spiritual and mystic elements of Ito’s practice. Placed outside the house is a floating teapot fountain that appears to be infinitely pouring itself into a stone wishing well. Inside the house, a bowl of ramen with a pair of hashi suspended midair, spin clockwise infinitely on a table. Both works draw attention to metaphysical and oppositional forces—presence and absence. 

Greg Ito (b. 1987, Los Angeles, CA) earned his BFA from San Francisco Art Institute in 2008. His work has been exhibited widely in group and solo exhibitions at galleries including Maki Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles, CA; Division Gallery, Montreal, QC; Arsenal Contemporary, Toronto, ON; Jeffrey Deitch New York, NY; Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, IL; Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles, CA; Et al, San Francisco, CA; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts – YBCA, San Francisco, CA. A forthcoming solo exhibition at the new Institute of Contemporary Art San Diego will open in 2022. Ito lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Fossils

Faith Wilding

October 2 - November 20, 2021

Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce a solo presentation by Faith Wilding. On view at 6150 Wilshire Blvd, opening Saturday, October 2, 2021. This is Wilding’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. 

This exhibition presents a series of graphite works on paper collectively called ‘Fossils,’ that continue the artist’s explorations of emergence, transformation, renewal, rebirth, potential, and possibility. Wilding began working with graphite drawings in the 70s, focusing on nature-infused imagery such as petal shapes, shells, vines, and other botanical forms. Her current body of work presented here, revives and furthers this focus replete with allusions to the body—capillaries, limbs, and sex organs. Together the drawings serve as a warning and mournful requiem for the vanishing beauty of this earth.

As an avowed ecofeminist, Wilding’s work addresses the deterioration of the natural world in her lifetime, specifically in South America and her native Paraguay. With her meticulously rendered compositions, the artist depicts dualities: up and down, in and out, open and closed, evoking mystical, personal, and esoteric narratives. The works express interconnectedness and spiritual exuberance, while exploring visionary iconology of energy and force of growth.

Wilding’s practice emerged at the forefront of Feminist Art in Los Angeles during the late 1960s and 1970s. For the last 50 years, Wilding has lived as an activist and artist, with a fierce commitment to ecofeminism. Wilding was a co-initiator of the Feminist Art Programs alongside Miriam Shapiro and Judy Chicago. Fueled by the explosion of female-focused work and research, these artists sought to move beyond the predominantly male-centric art history. Wilding’s work continues to interrogate societal narratives, challenging the status quo in art-making, life, and politics.

Faith Wilding (b. 1943, Paraguay) has exhibited extensively over the last five decades at Reina Sofia Museum (Madrid); Centre for Contemporary Arts (Glasgow); Bronx Museum of Art (New York); the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York); the Hammer Museum (Los Angeles); the Drawing Center (New York); Documenta X (Kassel) and the Singapore Art Museum. Wilding was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2009 and has been the recipient of two individual media grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2014, she was awarded the prestigious Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award. Her work is in many important public collections including the Hammer Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Museum, The University Club of Chicago, and the Marciano Art Foundation Collection. Wilding lives and works in Rhode Island.