The Armory Show

ALEC EGAN, ALANNAH FARRELL, TINA GIROUARD, JAIME MUÑOZ, JORDAN NASSAR, NEIL RAITT, ROBERT RUSSELL, SIGRID SANDSTRÖM, COSMO WHYTE, FAITH WILDING

SEPTEMBER 9 – 12, 2021

BOOTH 230

 

Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce a curated selection of works by ten artists for The Armory Show 2021. This presentation represents a cross-section of our varied and interconnected program that fosters emerging and historic artists including Alec Egan, Alannah Farrell, Tina Girouard, Jaime Muñoz, Jordan Nassar, Neil Raitt, Robert Russell, Sigrid Sandström, Cosmo Whyte, and Faith Wilding.

Among the featured works are historical collaborative sequin works of Tina Girouard, a largely overlooked, but key artist within the New York post-minimal and Pattern and Decoration movements. Connected to Girouard’s collaborative craft, is Palestinian-American Jordan Nassar, whose work with traditional forms of embroidery and craft ruminates on issues of the diaspora, cultural authenticity, and political activism. His collaborative embroidered pieces for the presentation present a dialogue between his own position as a young member of diaspora and the women of the West Bank. 

Issues of diaspora and cultural hybridity are also echoed in Cosmo Whyte’s work, the artist renders imagery of historic protest and black activism in semi-abstracted charcoal on paper works. Avowed eco-feminist Faith Wilding’s vibrant watercolor and ink drawings are dense with nature-infused imagery and express interconnectedness, while exploring visionary iconography of the energy and force of growth. For the first time we are also presenting works by Los Angeles artist Jaime Muñoz, whose visual language is focused on aspects of identity, the commodification of labor, religion, and critiques of Latin American colonialism and Modernism.

Thick impastoed paintings by Alec Egan are premised on fictitious memory, willfully playing on conceptual tropes of nostalgia as well as formal concerns such as pattern, color, and light. Each of Alannah Farrell’s portraits are a protest, an exercise in safety, community building and nurturing intimacy against the alienation, anxieties, and violences of modern queer life. The surreal landscapes of Neil Raitt address the function of painting in an era of digital art, his compositions exist as a suspension of illusionary space and traditional senses of perspective. Robert Russell’s ‘Teacup’ series addresses ideas of memory, iconography, and mortality in a personal language that is attentive to beauty, the history of painting, and the role of photography. Sigrid Sandström’s elusive abstract paintings of non-inhabited places call forth a range of associations from landscapes to cosmic forms—the raw canvas ground against a playful and expressive color palette.

Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Anat Ebgi at The Armory Show, 2021, Installation view
Jordan Nassar Voyage to the hollow of a valley, 2021
Hand embroidered cotton on cotton, artist frame 55 ¹⁄₂ x 51 ¹⁄₂ inches / 141 x 130.8 cm
Faith Wilding Up Rooted, 2019
Watercolor, ink, gold leaf, and graphite on paper, framed 26 ¹⁄₂ x 20 ¹⁄₂ inches / 67.3 x 52.1 cm
Faith Wilding Large Herbal, 2019
Watercolor and gold leaf on paper, framed 20 ¹⁄₂ x 26 ¹⁄₂ inches / 52.1 x 67.3 cm
Jaime Muñoz Morning Commute, 2021
Acrylic, glitter, paper, and velvet flocking on wood panel 72 x 60 inches
Jaime Muñoz Morning Commute, 2021
Detail
Jaime Muñoz Conejo, 2016 - 2021
Ceramic terracotta, glaze, enamel paint, and archival letter font 14 ¹⁄₄ x 12 ¹⁄₄ x 7 ³⁄₄ inches / 36.2 x 31.1 x 19.7 cm
Tina Girouard Purple Floral, 1992
Sequins, beads and embroidery on fabric 35 x 36 inches / 88.9 x 91.4 cm
Tina Girouard Pink Floral (Lillypad), Undated (1990s)
Sequins and beads on fabric 33 ¹⁄₂ x 35 inches / 85.1 x 88.9 cm
Tina Girouard Pink Floral (Lillypad), Undated (1990s)
Detail
Cosmo Whyte Untitled, 2021
Charcoal and gouache on paper 27 x 26 inches / 68.6 x 66 cm
Cosmo Whyte On the verge of discovery, 2021
Charcoal and gouache on paper 65 x 72 inches / 165.1 x 182.9 cm
Cosmo Whyte On the verge of discovery, 2021
Detail
Alannah Farrell Alex in Red, 2021
Acrylic, flashe, and oil on canvas 60 x 30 inches / 152.4 x 76.2 cm
Sigrid Sandström Ascendant, 2021
Acrylic on canvas, framed 78 x 78 inches / 198.1 x 198.1 cm
Robert Russell Teacup #22, 2021
Oil on canvas 60 x 60 inches / 152.4 x 152.4 cm
Neil Raitt Emerald Cave, 2021
Oil on canvas 50 x 40 cm
Neil Raitt Tangerine Sunset, 2021
Oil on canvas 100 x 70 cm / 39 ³⁄₈ x 27 ⁹⁄₁₆ inches

EXHIBITION TEXT

ALEC EGAN, ALANNAH FARRELL, TINA GIROUARD, JAIME MUÑOZ, JORDAN NASSAR, NEIL RAITT, ROBERT RUSSELL, SIGRID SANDSTRÖM, COSMO WHYTE, FAITH WILDING

SEPTEMBER 9 – 12, 2021

BOOTH 230

 

Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce a curated selection of works by ten artists for The Armory Show 2021. This presentation represents a cross-section of our varied and interconnected program that fosters emerging and historic artists including Alec Egan, Alannah Farrell, Tina Girouard, Jaime Muñoz, Jordan Nassar, Neil Raitt, Robert Russell, Sigrid Sandström, Cosmo Whyte, and Faith Wilding.

Among the featured works are historical collaborative sequin works of Tina Girouard, a largely overlooked, but key artist within the New York post-minimal and Pattern and Decoration movements. Connected to Girouard’s collaborative craft, is Palestinian-American Jordan Nassar, whose work with traditional forms of embroidery and craft ruminates on issues of the diaspora, cultural authenticity, and political activism. His collaborative embroidered pieces for the presentation present a dialogue between his own position as a young member of diaspora and the women of the West Bank. 

Issues of diaspora and cultural hybridity are also echoed in Cosmo Whyte’s work, the artist renders imagery of historic protest and black activism in semi-abstracted charcoal on paper works. Avowed eco-feminist Faith Wilding’s vibrant watercolor and ink drawings are dense with nature-infused imagery and express interconnectedness, while exploring visionary iconography of the energy and force of growth. For the first time we are also presenting works by Los Angeles artist Jaime Muñoz, whose visual language is focused on aspects of identity, the commodification of labor, religion, and critiques of Latin American colonialism and Modernism.

Thick impastoed paintings by Alec Egan are premised on fictitious memory, willfully playing on conceptual tropes of nostalgia as well as formal concerns such as pattern, color, and light. Each of Alannah Farrell’s portraits are a protest, an exercise in safety, community building and nurturing intimacy against the alienation, anxieties, and violences of modern queer life. The surreal landscapes of Neil Raitt address the function of painting in an era of digital art, his compositions exist as a suspension of illusionary space and traditional senses of perspective. Robert Russell’s ‘Teacup’ series addresses ideas of memory, iconography, and mortality in a personal language that is attentive to beauty, the history of painting, and the role of photography. Sigrid Sandström’s elusive abstract paintings of non-inhabited places call forth a range of associations from landscapes to cosmic forms—the raw canvas ground against a playful and expressive color palette.